Can you find your ancestor in the Midland Bank Roll of Honour?

The reverse of one of the cards from the Midland Bank Roll of Honour, detailing an individuals "history while with the forces".

The reverse of one of the cards from the Midland Bank Roll of Honour, detailing “history while with the forces”.

Have you explored the Midland Bank Roll of Honour on Lives of the First World War? HSBC, who kindly donated the records to the project, are looking to speak to members of the public whose ancestors worked for the bank and served in the First World War.

You may remember that we recently added another free official record set Lives of the First World War, the Midland Bank Roll of Honour, kindly donated to the project by HSBC. This incredible record set holds details of the bank’s employees who were granted leave to serve in the First World War. Many of the cards are incredibly detailed, providing facts such as date of birth, enlistment date, and even a service history.

HSBC are currently putting together an exhibition at their head office in London commemorating the Lives of those who worked for the bank and served in the war, and are looking to speak to members of the public who whose relatives are named on the Midland Bank Roll of Honour. It’ll be a fantastic opportunity to find out more about your ancestor, see their card from the roll of honour first hand, and more importantly see their life story commemorated in the exhibition.

Do you have a relative that might have worked for the Midland Bank and served in the First World War?

Already know that your relative worked for Midland Bank? We’d love to hear from you. Email us at livesofthefirstworldwar@iwm.org.uk, or comment on this blog post, and tell us your story.

Edgar Branson Nurse

A photo of Gunner Edgar Branson Nurse in uniform. Image © IWM / Paul Dougan

Gunner Edgar Branson Nurse. Image © IWM / Paul Dougan

One of the incredible life stories that has already been uncovered from the Midlank Bank Roll of Honour, Edgar Branson Nurse was born in Wandsworth, London, on the 14 June 1896.

He volunteered to join the Royal Flying Corps on the 12 November 1915, aged only 19, but his medical revealed that he wasn’t fit enough.

Information on the HSBC card reveals that he later joined the Royal Field Artillery in February 1917. It may have been that he had recovered from the medical condition that rendered him unfit in 1915, or that conditions were relaxed as more men were needed to replace casualties at the front.nike air max ltd

Edgar died on the 31 November 1918 in Jullundur, India.

Remember Edgar’s life story on Lives of the First World War

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